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Thursday 22 August 2019
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Topic: *** Editor's Pick

August 15, 2019
First time that researchers have been able to use synovial fluid from human osteoarthritis patients to excite sensory nerve cells
A team at the University of Cambridge has shown how, in osteoarthritis patients, the viscous lubricant that ordinarily allows our joints to move smoothly triggers a pain response from nerve cells similar that caused by chilli peppers.
 
August 15, 2019
Discovery gives new insight into both how and why many lupus patients suffer from these symptoms
A breakthrough study by a SUNY Downstate Health Sciences University research team in the US has identified a specific antibody target implicated in neuropsychiatric symptoms of lupus. 
 
These symptoms, including cognitive impairment, mood disorders, seizures, headaches and psychosis, are among the most prevalent manifestations of the disease and occur in as many as 80% of adults and 95% of children with lupus. 
 
August 9, 2019
Researchers at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in the US have identified a pathway in the immune system activated in Crohn's disease that holds promise for investigating new treatments
Researchers at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine identified a pathway in the immune system activated in Crohn's disease (CD) and which holds promise for investigating new treatments.
 
August 8, 2019
Urine biomarkers represent promising candidates for the early diagnosis as well as the monitoring of disease activity and therapeutic responses in lupus nephritis
University of Houston researcher Chandra Mohan is reporting in Arthritis Research and Therapy that clotting proteins, both those that promote blood clots (pro-thrombotic) and those that work to dissipate them (thrombolytic), are elevated in the urine of patients who suffer from lupus nephritis (LN).
 
August 8, 2019
Dupixent is the first and only biologic to show positive results in this paediatric atopic dermatitis population.
A pivotal Phase III trial evaluating Dupixent® (dupilumab) in severe atopic dermatitis in children has met its primary and secondary endpoints. 
 
August 8, 2019
The research, published in Science Advances, involved an international collaboration of the world's leading coeliac disease experts
Distinct markers in the blood of people with coeliac disease have been detected within a few hours of gluten being consumed.
 
The research, published in Science Advances, involved an international collaboration of the world's leading coeliac disease experts.
 
The peer-reviewed study included the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research in Australia, University of Oslo in Norway, and in the US, Massachusetts General Hospital and University of Chicago. 
August 8, 2019
It is hoped that the new guidance will help prescribers better understand which patients' health could be put at risk by using an organiser and also help patients and their carers know what they can ask for to help with taking medicines as prescribed.
Researchers at the University of East Anglia have developed guidance to help prescribers and pharmacists decide which patients should use a pill organiser.
 
The team's previous research has shown that switching to using an organiser can do more harm than good. Their latest study reveals that pharmacies are giving out twice as many pill organisers as they were ten years ago.
 
August 7, 2019
Dupixent is now the first biologic medicine approved in the EU to treat these patients.

The European Commission has extended the marketing authorisation for Dupixent® (dupilumab) in the European Union to include adolescents 12 to 17 years of age with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis who are candidates for systemic therapy.

Dupixent is now the first biologic medicine approved in the EU to treat these patients.
 

August 7, 2019
Neratinib, which is taken as 6 x 40 mg tablets daily for one year, represents a further adjuvant treatment option in the early breast cancer treatment pathway
The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence has published draft guidance recommending neratinib as an additional treatment for some people with early hormone-receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer.
 
August 6, 2019
Although previous studies have found many genes that exert an effect on these diseases, research have been unable to explain the whole genetic background to the origin of asthma, hay fever and eczema
In a new study from SciLifeLab at Uppsala University, researchers have found a total of 141 genes that largely explain the genetic risk underlying asthma, hay fever and eczema. 
 
As many as 41 of the genes identified have not previously been linked to an elevated risk for these diseases. The results are published in the scientific journal Human Molecular Genetics.1
 
August 6, 2019
Transplanting T-cells boosts efficacy of immunotherapies in several cancers
Researchers have developed a way to use immunotherapy drugs against treatment-resistant non-Hodgkin's lymphomas for the first time by combining them with stem cell transplantation, an approach that also dramatically increased the success of the drugs in melanoma and lung cancer
 
The study was published in Cancer Discovery in August.
 
August 6, 2019
Research suggests that IP1867B could be effective against glioblastoma, one of the most aggressive forms of human brain cancer, which kills thousands of patients within a year
A new drug, known as IP1867B, could be used for future treatments of brain tumours.
 
Dr Richard Hill led the research team at the Brain Tumour Research Centre at University of Portsmouth, working with the University of Algarve (Portugal), the University of Liverpool (UK) and Innovate Pharmaceuticals to examine IP1867B.
 
The research team showed that IP1867B worked with existing cancer treatments boosting their effectiveness and, in some cases, restored sensitivity to some treatments.
August 6, 2019
Parkinson’s UK have partnered with the University of Sheffield to develop a treatment that could protect brain cells affected by Parkinson’s
Charity Parkinson’s UK is partnering with the University of Sheffield to discover and develop a potential drug that could protect the dopamine-producing brain cells affected by Parkinson’s.
 
The charity will invest up to £100,000 as part of their pioneering Virtual Biotech programme. This initiative aims to fast-track the best ideas and rapidly turn them into promising treatments, that can be tested and progressed to transform the lives of people with Parkinson’s.
 
August 5, 2019
A significant increase in the incidence of allergies has been registered in developed countries, first beginning in the 1960s and steadily progressing thereafter
A study from NHS Digital – data from which were reported on the BBC website in 20161 –  showed that there had been a 33% increase in admissions for different forms of allergy and an increase of 19% of cases of anaphylactic shock in hospital facilities in the UK in the preceding five years.
 
And the UK is not alone in this, in that a significant increase in the incidence of allergies has been registered in developed countries, first beginning in the 1960s and steadily progressing thereafter. 
August 2, 2019
It is the first time that researchers have found a biomarker for kidney transplant rejection by antibodies.
A group of European scientists led by KU Leuven has found a biomarker that can identify patients with symptoms of kidney rejection symptoms after a transplant as a result of antibodies. 
 
The identification can be done through a simple blood test and at an early stage. It is the first known biomarker for rejection by antibodies. The researchers hope that the test can be further developed quickly for use in the hospital.
 
August 2, 2019
Scientists have identified a subtype of immune cell that drives the production of antibodies associated with anaphylaxis and other allergic reactions
Scientists have identified a subtype of immune cell that drives the production of antibodies associated with anaphylaxis and other allergic reactions. 
 
The research was funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, and reveals a potential target for new therapies to prevent severe allergic reactions. The findings are published online in the journal Science.
 
August 2, 2019
People with Lynch syndrome have an increased lifetime risk – estimated to be four out of five people – of developing colorectal cancer
Aspirin taken daily for more than two years could reduce the risk of colorectal cancer in people with an inherited genetic condition, NICE has said in new draft guidance.1
 
People with Lynch syndrome (LS) have an increased lifetime risk – estimated to be four out of five people – of developing colorectal cancer.
 
August 2, 2019
The University of Edinburgh study shows that Crohn's disease affects 284 people out of every 100,000 in Scotland's capital
Edinburgh has some of the highest known rates of inflammatory bowel disease in the world and the figure is expected to rise in the next ten years.
 
Researchers say that one in 125 people in the city have Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis - collectively known as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).
 
They predict this figure will rise to 1 in 98 by 2028, putting further strain on NHS resources.
 
August 1, 2019
The brain activity of patients with depression, captured by MRI scans, may help doctors predict who will respond to cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT)
In a new study, led by the University of Glasgow and published in Science Advances, scientists show that brain activity recorded using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) may help predict response to cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) in depression before the treatment commences.
 
The advances could help patients receive the most appropriate treatment for depression in a timely manner.
 
August 1, 2019
A scheme that pays hospitals to deliver high quality care has been shown to improve the outcomes for patients with broken hips in England
Hip fractures are a major cause of death and disability among older people worldwide, with 70,000 cases every year in the UK, which cost the National Health Service (NHS) in the UK around £2 billion.
 
In 2010, a Best Practice Tariff (BPT) was launched across England, which promised extra payments to hospitals for each hip fracture patient whose care satisfied six clinical standards, such as surgery within 36 hours.
 
July 31, 2019
The World Health Organization estimates that 235 million people around the world suffer from asthma. But little is known about the impact of asthma on symptomatic people's ability to work.

A multi-national survey has revealed that asthma sufferers are missing nearly one-tenth of work hours due to their symptoms, which also results in a loss of productivity and affects their emotional wellbeing.

This new research, published in the Journal of Asthma and Allergy, surveyed over 1500 symptomatic asthma patients across six countries and found that, on average three out of four workers could not work to their full potential.

July 30, 2019
The funds from the MS Society and Parkinson’s UK will enable an all-new digital brain bank, ambitious virtual reality initiative, and new research projects
Two leading neurological charities have announced £3 million of funding for Europe’s largest brain and tissue bank, based in London.
 
The funds from the MS Society and Parkinson’s UK will enable an all-new digital brain bank, ambitious virtual reality initiative, and new research projects, which could help researchers finally stop multiple sclerosis (MS) and Parkinson’s for good.
 
July 29, 2019
The discovery adds further evidence to support the prenatal sex steroid theory of autism first proposed 20 years ago
Scientists have identified a link between exposure to high levels of oestrogen sex hormones in the womb and the likelihood of developing autism. 
 
The findings have been published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry.1
 
July 29, 2019
The CHMP’s positive opinion is based on results from four randomised, controlled Phase III trials that incorporate data from more than 714 patients with either LGS or Dravet syndrome, two forms of epilepsy with high morbidity and mortality rates
GW Pharmaceuticals has announced that the CHMP has adopted a positive opinion recommending marketing authorisation of Epidyolex (cannabidiol oral solution) for use as adjunctive therapy of seizures associated with Lennox‑Gastaut syndrome (LGS) or Dravet syndrome, in conjunction with clobazam, for patients 2 years of age and older. 
 
The European Commission  is expected to make a final decision on the marketing authorisation application in approximately two months.