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Wednesday 19 June 2019
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Topic: Allergy

June 6, 2019
Scientists have found that young children with severe eczema infected with Staphylococcus aureus are at a higher risk of developing a food allergy
In a study published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, scientists from King's College London have found that young children with severe eczema infected with Staphylococcus aureus (SA) bacterium, are at a higher risk of developing a food allergy.1
 
Staphylococcus aureus (SA) is found in the nose and the skin of healthy individuals; however, SA is more common in sufferers of eczema, especially severe eczema.
 
June 6, 2019
In the Phase III POLYP 1 and POLYP 2 studies, omalizumab met both co-primary endpoints and key secondary endpoints in adults with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps with inadequate response to intranasal corticosteroids
Novartis has announced positive topline data from two Phase III, multicentre studies evaluating omalizumab (Xolair®) for the treatment of adults with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) who have not adequately responded to standard-of-care (intranasal corticosteroids). 
 
Omalizumab, an injectable biologic treatment designed to target and block immunoglobulin E (IgE), met both co-primary endpoints and key secondary endpoints across both POLYP 1 and POLYP 2 Phase III trials.
May 30, 2019
QUARTZ is the first completed study of the Phase III PLATINUM clinical development program which evaluates both QMF149 and QVM149 (indacaterol acetate, glycopyrronium bromide and mometasone furoate)
Novartis has announced the first study results from the Phase III PLATINUM clinical development program assessing the safety and efficacy of QMF149, an investigational, once-daily, fixed dose combination asthma treatment containing indacaterol acetate (IND - a long-acting beta agonist [LABA]) and mometasone furoate (MF - an anti-inflammatory (ICS)).
 
May 29, 2019
Interplay between psychological factors and allergies in the research spotlight

Led by Claudia Traidl-Hoffmann, Director of the University Center for Health Sciences at University Hospital Augsburg (UNIKA-T) and Professor of Environmental Medicine at the Technical University of Munich, the team has differentiated between perennial or non-seasonal allergies and study participants also answered questions about their psychological health.

May 29, 2019
Among 20 children with EoE who wore the Viaskin Milk patch, nine saw an improvement in their symptoms and normalisation of their biopsies after 11 months

A study from Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) finds that a skin patch may be useful in treating children with a painful, chronic condition called eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE) triggered by milk.1

May 23, 2019
Inhaled combination for asthma treatment (indacaterol acetate, glycopyrronium bromide and mometasone furoate) was superior to the standard of care (long-acting beta-agonist/inhaled corticosteroid) in terms of lung function in a Phase II study
New Phase II data for Novartis's IND/GLY/MF (QVM149), an investigational, once-daily, fixed dose combination asthma treatment containing indacaterol acetate, glycopyrronium bromide and mometasone furoate, delivered with the dose-confirming Breezhaler® inhalation device, has been presented at the 2019 annual international congress of the American Thoracic Society (ATS).
 
April 29, 2019
The diagnosis of the causes of urticaria is very challenging, because very many physiological or pathological conditions are associated with the appearance of hives
Urticaria is a clinical condition characterised by the presence of skin lesions, called wheals. Typically, these are intensely itchy and surrounded by an area of erythema. Wheals can have a diameter from a few millimetres or appear as confluent lesions with a diameter of several centimetres. In some cases, urticaria is associated with angioedema, which appears as a swelling of soft tissues from fluid accumulation due to dermal oedema.
 
April 24, 2019
Research illuminates the relationship between eczema and food allergy

Scratching the skin triggers a series of immune responses culminating in an increased number of activated mast cells in the small intestine, according to research conducted in mice.

This newly identified skin-gut communication helps illuminate the relationship between food allergy and atopic dermatitis. The study was supported by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, and led by researchers at Boston Children's Hospital.1

April 15, 2019
Identification of the allergic triggers of rhinitis is crucial in order to implement adequate avoidance measures in both atopic and non-atopic patients; moreover, this identification can help administer specific therapies, such as allergen immunotherapy
Rhinitis is an inflammatory disorder of the nasal mucosa clinically defined by two or more symptoms of nasal itching, sneezing, anterior or posterior rhinorrhoea, and nasal blockage.1
 
April 12, 2019
Scientists could be a step closer to providing more precise pollen forecasts to the 25% of the UK population who live with either asthma or hay fever
A study published in Nature Ecology & Evolution has shown that it is not just the overall 'load' of grass pollen in the air that could cause those particularly bad days for asthma and hay fever sufferers.1 Days that see increased asthma attacks or intense hay fever could be related to the release of pollen from particular grass species.
 
April 12, 2019
An eight-year hunt for the cells that drive the extreme childhood food allergy eosinophilic oesophagitis has identified a potential new way to treat the disease while also raising questions about a dietary supplement taken to reduce bowel inflammation
An eight-year hunt for the cells that drive the extreme childhood food allergy eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) has identified a potential new way to treat the disease while also raising questions about a dietary supplement often taken to reduce bowel inflammation.
 
The study, led by experts at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, is posted online in the Journal of Clinical Investigation1 and will be published in print in May. 
 
April 12, 2019
Researchers have effectively prevented the binding of peanut allergens with IgE to suppress the allergic reaction to peanuts using a first-in-class design of allergen-specific inhibitors
In a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers at the University of Notre Dame in the US have effectively prevented the binding of peanut allergens with IgE to suppress the allergic reaction to peanuts using a first-in-class design of allergen-specific inhibitors.
 
April 5, 2019
An international research team has found that patients with the lung disease bronchiectasis also often display sensitivity to airborne allergens, and has highlighted the particular role that fungi appear to play
An international research team from Singapore has found that patients with the lung disease bronchiectasis also often display sensitivity to airborne allergens, and has highlighted the particular role that fungi appear to play.
 
Their discovery suggests that bronchiectasis patients should be examined for a range of allergies, since the treatment for allergies already exists and controlling them could prevent the bronchiectasis from worsening.
 
March 28, 2019
ARTEMIS data demonstrate that most patients exceeded what are considered to be protective levels well before a full year of treatment
Aimmune has announced that its Phase III European clinical trial of AR101 for the treatment of peanut allergy, known as ARTEMIS (AR101 Trial in Europe Measuring oral Immunotherapy Success), met its primary efficacy endpoint. 
 
March 26, 2019
Results presented at ENDO 2019, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting
Researchers using the world's largest twin registry to study seven autoimmune diseases found the risk of developing the seven diseases is largely inherited, but that some diseases are more closely related than others.
 
March 18, 2019
The role of the allergy specialist is critical in risk identification, diagnosis and management of potentially severe allergic reactions in both children and adults
Allergies are a major ongoing problem, especially in Western countries. Currently, it is estimated that about a quarter of the world's population suffers from some type of allergy, mainly due to allergic rhinitis or allergic bronchial asthma.
 
However, the most dangerous reactions (anaphylaxis) usually occur through allergic reactions to foods, drugs and Hymenoptera (for example, wasps, bees, ants, etc) bites.
 
The Big Eight
March 4, 2019
CHMP recommends Dupixent® (dupilumab) for use in adults and adolescents 12 years and older as add on maintenance treatment for certain forms of severe asthma
The European Medicines Agency’s
Committee for
February 28, 2019
After completing up to four years of egg oral immunotherapy treatment, certain study participants were able to safely incorporate egg into their diet for five years
New research regarding egg oral immunotherapy (eOIT) has been presented at the annual American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology conference in San Francisco.
 
February 20, 2019
Researchers at the University of Helsinki have found that pollen allergen immunotherapy has favourable effects on the molecular events and microbiome profile in the nasal membrane
Birch pollen allergic rhinitis is the most common chronic disorder in the Northern part of the globe, and it attributes to significant morbidity and economic burden.
 
According to a study by researchers at the University of Helsinki, pollen allergen immunotherapy has favourable effects on the molecular events and microbiome profile in the nasal membrane.
 
January 23, 2019
Those aged 18-29 are the most likely to suffer an asthma attack and least likely to receive life-saving asthma care than any other age group, research has revealed.

Those aged 18-29 are the most likely to suffer an asthma attack and least likely to receive life-saving asthma care than any other age group, research has revealed.
 
Two-thirds (67%) of patients in this group are not receiving basic asthma care – higher than any other age group – a survey of more than 10,000 asthma patients by the charity Asthma UK revealed.
 
Patients in this age group are also twice as likely to receive emergency asthma care than patients aged over 60, the charity said.
 

January 15, 2019
The findings of a study published in Nature Medicine might inform research to develop microbiome-based therapies to prevent or treat food allergy
Scientists at the University of Chicago have found that gut microbes from healthy human infant donors transplanted into mice protected animals exposed to milk from experiencing allergic reactions, while gut microbes transplanted from infants allergic to milk did not.
 
The study, published in Nature Medicine,1 was supported in part by NIH’s National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. 
 
December 17, 2018
Omalizumab prefilled syringe is the first and only biologic to receive European Commission approval for self-administration in severe allergic asthma and chronic spontaneous urticaria
Novartis has announced that the European Commission (EC) has approved Xolair® (omalizumab) prefilled syringe (PFS) for self-administration, allowing patients with severe allergic asthma (SAA) and chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) to administer their own treatment.
 
With this approval, Xolair is the first and only biologic to offer the option of self-administration for SAA and CSU.
 
December 17, 2018
There are scant data that describe how often pregnant women deliberately stop eating a specific food item in order to prevent future food allergies in their newborns
Pregnant women routinely swear off alcohol and tobacco to boost their chances of having a healthy baby. What about common food allergens like nuts and milk?
 
December 17, 2018
The researchers hope the Pediatric Asthma Risk Score will become the most common tool used by medical practitioners to predict asthma and help prevent the common airway disease from developing
Scientists at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center in the US have created and tested a decision tool that appears to be the most accurate, non-invasive method yet developed to predict asthma in young children.
 
The researchers hope the Pediatric Asthma Risk Score (PARS) will become the most common tool used by medical practitioners to predict asthma and help prevent the common airway disease from developing.