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Sunday 21 July 2019
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Topic: Rheumatology

July 15, 2019
The rapid, non-invasive technique could help clinicians diagnose the disease earlier, and assess how effectively the selected treatment is controlling the progression of the disease
A new way of detecting rheumatoid arthritis using infrared light could offer an objective way of diagnosing the disease and monitoring treatment effectiveness, a University of Birmingham, UK study shows.
 
June 20, 2019
The purpose of the study was to assess the drug’s pharmacokinetics, efficacy and safety for treatment of MAS and to confirm the proposed dose regimen
SOBI has announced that new research demonstrating the effects of emapalumab in patients with macrophage activation syndrome (MAS), a form of secondary haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) complicating systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA), was presented at the EULAR/Paediatric Rheumatology European Society (PReS) Scientific Congress in Madrid.  
 
June 19, 2019
Research led by the University of Birmingham in the UK has found re-purposing already existing drugs or combining therapies could be used to treat patients who have difficult to treat autoimmune diseases
Funded by Versus Arthitis, research led by the University of Birmingham's Institute of Inflammation and Ageing and Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences has been published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.1
 
The research, a collaboration with the University of Oxford, University of Cambridge, University of York, Université Rennes in France, and the University of Lausanne in Switzerland, was supported by the National Institute for Health Research Birmingham Biomedical Research Centre.
June 16, 2019
Study also reveals venous thromboembolism and epilepsy as potential novel comorbidities
A study has shown increased rates of type I diabetes and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in patients that go on to develop rheumatoid arthritis (RA).1 
 
Results of the study demonstrate that the RA group reported significantly more cases of inflammatory bowel disease (1.9% vs. 0.5%, p<0.001) and type I diabetes (1.3% vs. 0.4%, p=0.01) versus controls.1
 
June 15, 2019
Initial pilot data support the use of new neurostimulation treatment in a larger study in patients who have failed current standard of care
The results of a study suggest that electro stimulation of the vagus nerve could provide a novel treatment approach for patients with rheumatoid arthritis.1 
 
This is a really exciting development. For many patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis, current treatments don’t work, or aren’t tolerated,” said Professor Thomas Dörner, Chairperson of the Scientific Programme Committee, EULAR. 
 
June 14, 2019
In the European Union alone, an extra one million employees could be in work each day if early interventions were more widely accessible for people with rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases (RMDs)
EULAR has launched the Time2Work campaign to raise awareness of the impact rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases (RMDs) have, not only on individuals, but wider society, productivity and our economies and what can be done to improve this situation.
 
Affecting one quarter of the EU population (120 million), RMDs are the biggest cause of sick leave and premature retirement due to physical disability. As one of the main causes of physical disability, RMDs contribute considerably to loss of productivity in the workplace.
June 14, 2019
Over half of patients and rheumatologists report diagnosis within six weeks as the most problematic standard of care
The results of a large pan-European survey presented at EULAR 2019 investigated significant gaps in rheumatoid arthritis care across 16 patient-centred Standards of Care (SoC) in rheumatoid arthritis.1  
 
June 14, 2019
Huge impact of pain and sleep on mental health raises questions about the level of care offered to patients
A survey has highlighted the significant impact of rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases (RMDs) on mental health and a worrying lack of psychological care.1
 
June 13, 2019
Study includes data from over 8000 people with psoriatic arthritis from four Nordic countries
The results of a study presented EULAR 2019 suggest that overall cancer risk is not linked to tumour necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi) use in psoriatic arthritis.
 
June 13, 2019
Study reports no vaccine infections in children given live-attenuated booster vaccine while on immune suppressing therapies
A study presented at EULAR 2019, jointly organised with the Paediatric Rheumatology Society (PReS), demonstrate no vaccine infections, and no disease flare, in the 234 rheumatic patients who received live-attenuated booster vaccination while taking immune suppressing therapies.1
 
June 6, 2019
Older men with scleroderma have more oestrogen than postmenopausal women with the disease, which could explain why the disease is often more severe in men
Oestrogen is the quintessentially female hormone.
 
It is surprising, then, that a Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) study found that a type of oestrogen, oestradiol, was more abundant in older men with scleroderma than in postmenopausal women with the disease. The MUSC team reports the findings of their National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded study in Arthritis Research & Therapy.
 
June 3, 2019
The management and treatment of rheumatoid arthritis is becoming more individualised thanks to the combined efforts of basic scientists and clinicians
The ultimate goal of modern medicine is a personalised approach for the individual patient, that is, a tailored management based on a finely tuned definition of immunogenetics, epigenetics, microbiome, and biomarkers, to maximise results and minimise risks of treatment (particularly of new biologics and small molecules). 
 
June 2, 2019
The evidence-based recommendations for the prevention and management of adult antiphospholipid syndrome are designed to help guide practice – and improve quality of care and patient outcomes
EULAR has published a set of recommendations for the management of antiphospholipid syndrome in adults.
 
Based on evidence from a systematic literature review and expert opinion, overarching principles and recommendations were formulated and voted. Three overarching principles and twelve recommendations were formulated. The overarching principles are:
May 31, 2019
A Federation called Sjögren Europe has been created by the national patient associations of ten European countries
Sjögren Europe is a European Federation of national patient associations for Sjögren’s Syndrome and rheumatic diseases created in February 2019 by the patient organisations of Finland, France, Greece, Italy, Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Switzerland, United Kingdom and the support of the informal association of Belgium.
 
May 30, 2019
The research was supported by Wellcome Trust, Versus Arthritis, and NIHR Birmingham Biomedical Research Centre, which is based at University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust and the University of Birmingham in the UK
Pioneering research by scientists at the Universities of Oxford and Birmingham published in Nature brings us a step closer to developing targeted therapies for inflammatory diseases.1
 
The research team shows, for the first time, that different types of fibroblasts - the most common cells of connective tissue in animals - are organised in different layers in the joint and are responsible for two very different forms of arthritis; osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.
 
May 30, 2019
Scientists used powerful cryo-electron microscopes at the University of Leeds' Astbury Centre to reveal the structure of the regulator, comprised of two proteins in the body called BRISC and SHMT2, to understand for the first time how they work together in a cell.
Scientists have identified a new internal regulator that helps control the body's response to fight infection.
 
The discovery could be a target for new drugs to tackle autoimmune diseases, such as lupus and scleroderma, where healthy tissues are attacked by the body's own immune system.
 
"We want to put a brake on the body's own immune system to stop it turning on itself," said Dr Elton Zeqiraj from the University of Leeds.
 
May 23, 2019
The findings highlight the importance of increased awareness of lupus and its accelerated progression in certain racial/ethnic groups, and they point to the need for greater efforts to support early diagnosis and treatment in these populations
In the first epidemiologic study comparing lupus among four major racial/ethnic groups, researchers found that, following a lupus diagnosis, Blacks, Asians/Pacific Islanders, and Hispanics are at increased risk of developing problems related to the kidneys, the neurological system, and the blood. The findings have been published in Arthritis Care & Research.1
 
April 15, 2019
New research suggests that B cells gone bad could be the culprit in rheumatoid arthritis
A comprehensive profile of B cells in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a first of its kind study, has been published in Arthritis & Rheumatology.1 
 
April 5, 2019
The recommendations report on emerging new evidence and expert opinion made since the first EULAR Recommendations on systemic lupus erythematosus were published in 2008
EULAR has published an update to a set of recommendations for the management of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). 
 
Treatment in SLE aims at remission or low disease activity and prevention of flares. The updated recommendations provide physicians and patients with updated consensus guidance on the management of SLE.
 
March 26, 2019
In contrast to rheumatoid arthritis, no serum autoantibody is associated with psoriatic arthritis, whereas other biomarkers have been proposed for early diagnosis of the disease or to predict treatment response for a more adequate allocation of resources
Psoriatic disease is a chronic inflammatory systemic condition characterised by psoriasis, which affects up to 3% of the general population, and in about 30% of cases, by psoriatic arthritis (PsA), which may also be diagnosed in the absence of a personal history of psoriasis.
 
February 25, 2019
Deleting a specific gene in mice alleviates arthritis symptoms and could be used to formulate a cure in humans, researchers have found.

Deleting a specific gene in mice alleviates arthritis symptoms and could be used to formulate a cure in humans, researchers have found.

Researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine found that deleting a gene called ELMO1 in mice reduced inflammation in acute and chronic arthritis models.1

This was particularly surprising because the researchers had hypothesised that deleting the gene would worsen inflammatory arthritis because it promotes cytoskeletal reorganisation during engulfment.

February 25, 2019
Deleting a specific gene in mice alleviates arthritis symptoms and could be used to formulate a cure in humans, researchers have found.

Deleting a specific gene in mice alleviates arthritis symptoms and could be used to formulate a cure in humans, researchers have found.

Researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine found that deleting a gene called ELMO1 in mice reduced inflammation in acute and chronic arthritis models.1

This was particularly surprising because the researchers had hypothesised that deleting the gene would worsen inflammatory arthritis because it promotes cytoskeletal reorganisation during engulfment.

February 11, 2019
Current genotyping capacity and proteomic tools strongly support the likelihood of the success of a personalised medicine approach in rheumatology and autoimmunity
 
Frailty is a syndrome characterised by reduced strength and endurance, accelerated decline in multiple physiologic functions and failure to restore homeostasis, particularly in senior subjects. In fact, frailty is a hallmark of ageing and predisposes subjects to health risks, such as fractures and falls, leading to further disability and morbidity and frequent adverse outcomes. Osteoporosis and immunosenescence (for example, ageing of the immune function) are paradigmatic components of this condition.
 
February 11, 2019
A study in identical twin toddlers has helped scientists to identify the first gene mutation that can single-handedly cause juvenile idiopathic arthritis
Identical twin toddlers who presented with severe arthritis helped scientists to identify the first gene mutation that can single-handedly cause a juvenile form of this inflammatory joint disease.
 
By investigating the DNA of individual blood cells of both children and then modelling the genetic defect in a mouse model, the research team led by Adrian Liston (VIB-KU Leuven) was able to unravel the disease mechanism. The findings may help to develop an appropriate treatment as well.