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Saturday 19 January 2019
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Topic: research

January 8, 2019
New plans for the NHS to tackle ‘killer conditions’ such as strokes and heart attacks could save up to half a million lives, the UK’s Government has announced.

The NHS Long Term Plan, published today (7 January) outlines how over three million people will be treated from new stroke, respiratory and cardiac services over the next decade.
 
The measures, supported by £4.5bn in new service model funding, will help prevent over 150,000 heart attacks, strokes and cases of dementia, according to the plan.
 
Measures in the plan will also help over three million people through improved stroke, respiratory and cardiac services over the next 10 years, it said.
 

November 7, 2018

An ovarian cancer drug could be an effective treatment for a difficult-to-treat type of brain tumour, research by a cancer charity has revealed.
 
Olaparib could leak through the blood brain barrier to treat glioblastoma – a condition which many other drugs have failed to treat – according to a study presented at the National Cancer Research Institute’s (NCRI) Cancer Conference in Liverpool on Monday (5 November).
 

October 3, 2018

The Nobel prize for physiology or medicine has gone to two scientists who have discovered how to fight cancer using the body’s immune system.
 
Professor James Allison from the University of Texas and Professor Tasuku Honjo from Kyoto University were awarded the prize for their ‘discovery of cancer therapy by inhibition of negative immune regulation’.
 
Their research has led to treatments for advanced skin cancer, which experts have said has proved to be ‘strikingly effective’.
 

September 26, 2018

Clinical education research pharmacist Michael Lloyd shares his pharmacy journey
 
Undergraduate experiences developed an interest in quantitative research, with my early career seeing involvement in many audits and quality improvement projects. I later completed a postgraduate Master’s degree that illuminated the world of qualitative methodologies and I was hooked!
 
 

May 17, 2016
A1M Pharma has initiated a research collaboration with global biotherapeutics company CSL Behring to investigate the potential of combining Alpha 1 Microglobulin (A1M) with proteins extracted from the fractionation of human plasma such as hemopexin and haptoglobin

A1M Pharma has initiated a research collaboration with global biotherapeutics company CSL Behring to investigate the potential of combining Alpha 1 Microglobulin (A1M) with proteins extracted from the fractionation of human plasma such as hemopexin and haptoglobin. This collaboration strengthens A1M Pharma’s position in the use of A1M for the treatment of life-threatening diseases with therapies that are based on naturally occurring substances.
 

August 10, 2015
Cancer Research UK’s Drug Discovery Committee* has awarded Newcastle University’s Northern Institute of Cancer Research £5M to bring more cancer drugs to clinical trials

The award will be given over five years and is designed to help build on Newcastle’s success in drug development. The extra money will help fund a programme of six to eight research projects, which will examine new strategies to develop medicines for cancer treatment.

December 7, 2009
The two companies have expanded their research collaboration agreement to evaluate In Cell Art nanocarrier technologies in the context of Sanofi Pasteur’s vaccines programme

In Cell Art of France, a biotechnology company involved in macromolecular drug-delivery systems (siRNA, DNA and proteins), has announced that it has expanded its research collaboration agreement with Sanofi Pasteur, the vaccines division of Sanofi Aventis Group, in order to evaluate In Cell Art nanocarrier technologies in the context of Sanofi Pasteur's vaccines programme.

October 5, 2009
Research that may prevent cancer cells spreading through the body is to be presented at the National Cancer Research Institute conference in Birmingham

Research that may prevent cancer cells spreading through the body is to be presented at the National Cancer Research Institute conference in Birmingham.

It centres on integrins, which anchor both healthy and cancer cells their 'home' tissue or organ and which can be destabilised by faults in the p53 protein.

Faulty p53 switches on the Rab-coupling protein (RCP) pathway cell-signalling system, which interferes with the normal delivery route of integrins to the cell's surface.

December 5, 2008
Research finds correlation between alcohol handwash and a reduction in MRSA infections

A direct correlation has been found between reductions in the rate of hospital MRSA infections and the amount of alcohol handwash supplied to a ward, according to research.

A study by University College London (UCL), in collaboration with the Health Protection Agency, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and the Hand-Hygiene Liaison Group, found MRSA rates are cut by 1% with each extra millilitre of alcohol hand rub supplied per patient per day.

September 2, 2008
Research suggests patients undergoing new joint operations may need repeat surgery

Patients undergoing certain types of new joint operations may be more likely to need repeat surgery, research has suggested.

A study into revision rates in England found that people having newer types of hip resurfacing and knee replacement were more likely to need further corrective surgery in the future.

Researchers from the Royal College of Surgeons of England looked at data for 327,557 hip or knee replacement procedures carried out between April 2003 and September 2006.

June 18, 2008
Vaccine and public health experts will gather in Paris to review the latest research

Vaccine and public health experts will gather in Paris to review the promise of and challenges related to today's vaccine research, what new products are expected and to discuss the way forward.

The eighth World Health Organization Global Vaccine Research Forum will take place at the Institut Pasteur, Paris, France, from 29 June to 2 July.

About 150 top vaccine researchers, scientists and public health experts from around the world will participate. The Forum is sponsored by the WHO Initiative for Vaccine Research.

May 28, 2008
The UK has allocated £64 million to set up partnerships between NHS bodies and universities

The UK government has allocated a total of £64 million to set up partnerships between NHS bodies and leading universities to conduct research into, and improve management of, major health conditions.

The seven new National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Collaborations for Health Research and Care, selected by an independent panel, will start work on 1 October 2008.

February 6, 2008
UK public support for the use of human tissue in research has risen over the past decade, suggests a study published ahead of print in the Journal of Clinical Pathology.

UK public support for the use of human tissue in research has risen over the past decade, suggests a study published ahead of print in the Journal of Clinical Pathology.

This is despite the adverse publicity generated by the incidents at the Bristol Royal Infirmary and Liverpool's Alder Hey Hospital, which prompted new legislation to be drawn up (Human Tissue Act 2004).

The Act requires specific patient consent for the use of human tissue, except that taken during surgery and stored.

January 28, 2008
Results of research released by The Harley Medical Group reveals nearly two thirds (64%) of cosmetic surgery patients take up to six months to recognise and feel comfortable with their new look.

Results of research released by The Harley Medical Group reveals nearly two thirds (64%) of cosmetic surgery patients take up to six months to recognise and feel comfortable with their new look. The remaining third (36%) cannot imagine that they ever looked any different.

The research was conducted by the UK-based The Harley Medical Group amongst their patients. Staff at Harley Medical Group use before and after pictures as a tool to help patients become accustomed to their new look.

January 17, 2008
Europe must adopt the World Health Organization (WHO) standard on fine particulate matter pollution concludes research in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

Europe must adopt the World Health Organization (WHO) standard on fine particulate matter pollution if it is to  significantly curb needless premature deaths, concludes research in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

Europe wants to cap average levels of fine particulate matter pollution (PM2.5) at 20 μg/m3 by 2010.

But the equivalent standard recommended by the US Environmental Protection Agency is 15 μg/m3, while that recommended by the World Health Organization is 10 μg/m3.