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Tuesday 22 October 2019
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Topic: surgery

October 12, 2017
New research shows encouraging evidence for a role of exercise training in patients in the weeks leading up to major surgery

Led by consultant anaesthetist Professor Gerard Danjoux from The James Cook University Hospital (Middlesbrough, UK), the multi-site, National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) funded study focused on patients who had abdominal aortic aneurysms - a potentially life-threatening swelling on the main abdominal blood vessel.

July 13, 2017
Leading specialists at the ICPIC congress came together to discuss the issue of SSIs and recent guidelines regarding the use of triclosan-coated sutures in all types of surgery

Ethicon has joined leading wound closure specialists to discuss recommendations to ease the burden of surgical site infections (SSIs) on patients and costs to healthcare systems across Europe, Middle East and Africa.

March 5, 2015
Almost 10 million people in the UK suffer from chronic pain, which has a major impact on quality of life and day to day activities, such as work; (1) however many of those people do not have their pain under control or know how to go about seeking the right treatment. A survey, which was conducted by St. Jude Medical in collaboration with Pain UK, recently interviewed 1614 people (1090 general respondents and 524 chronic pain sufferers) and found that although chronic pain is quite prevalent, there is a general lack of awareness about what chronic pain is and how it should be treated.
February 25, 2015
New guidance has been released by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) recommending Olympus Medical’s transurethral resection in saline (TURis) system for use in surgery to reduce the size of enlarged prostate glands in men. NICE published the guidance in light of the potential it offers NHS hospitals to realise substantial cost savings of £285–375 per patient whilst also improving patient outcomes. (1)

New guidance has been released by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) recommending Olympus Medical’s transurethral resection in saline (TURis) system for use in surgery to reduce the size of enlarged prostate glands in men. NICE published the guidance in light of the potential it offers NHS hospitals to realise substantial cost savings of £285–375 per patient whilst also improving patient outcomes. (1)

 

January 27, 2015
New survey results launched by Olympus Medical showed that nine out of ten (88%) surgeons surveyed believe advanced surgical energy devices such as THUNDERBEAT™ could revolutionise the way surgery is performed in the future, resulting in cost savings for the NHS.

New survey results (1) launched by Olympus Medical showed that nine out of ten (88%) surgeons surveyed believe advanced surgical energy devices such as THUNDERBEAT™ could revolutionise the way surgery is performed in the future, (1) resulting in cost savings for the NHS.

June 5, 2009
Major improvements in services are necessary to enable early surgery in appropriate patients to prevent strokes

Only one in five UK patients have surgery to reduce their risk of stroke within the two-week target time set by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE).

The authors call for major improvements in services to enable early surgery to prevent strokes in high-risk patients.

Every year in the UK, about 120,000 people have a transient ischaemic attack (TIA) or minor stroke, and up to 30% die within a month. Stroke is also the single-largest cause of severe disability in adults and costs the economy £7bn a year.

June 4, 2009
Software to synchronise the movement of a patient's heart with a cardiac surgeon's eye is being developed

Software to synchronise the movement of a patient's heart with a surgeon's eye is being developed to help make cardiac operations far easier to perform.

The technology, which can "still" a beating heart, will allow doctors to operate robotically without the trauma of carrying out a bypass.

Health Minister Lord Ara Darzi of Denham, a keyhole surgery pioneer, is involved in the project, which will be ready for clinical use within 18 months.

December 17, 2008
The UK could see its first full face transplant happen within a year

The UK`s first full face transplant might happen within a year, the leader of the UK facial transplantation research team has said.

Professor Peter Butler was speaking after the first such transplant was carried out in the US, itself only the fourth in the world.

He said: "We hope to make an announcement about this within the next 12 months."

His team at the Royal Free Hospital in London has permission for a research programme of four transplants.

November 25, 2008
NPSA issue alert following death caused by delays in blood supply to surgery

A man died on the operating table after delays in sending blood to the theatre where surgeons were battling to save his life, an inquest has heard.

As a result of the incident, the NHS National Patient Safety Agency has issued a Rapid Response Report to all UK surgical units.

It warns that "surgery should not be commissioned or delivered in facilities that lack the systems and equipment to manage emergencies safely".

November 17, 2008
UK health team awarded for outstanding services towards patient safety during surgical operations

An Edinburgh-based health team in the UK has been awarded for its work to protect patients undergoing surgery.

More than seven million surgical instruments are sterilised each year by the 109-strong team at Edinburgh Royal Infirmary, to make sure operations can go ahead safely.

It is the first public sector service to receive a top grade award from the Chartered Quality Institute, the NHS said.

October 13, 2008
Investigation underway after four patients die following heart transplants

The deaths of four people within a month of their operations has led the national health watchdog to look into Harefield Hospital's heart transplant programme.

Four consecutive deaths were reported between July and September, whereas no patients died within 30 days last year.

Royal Brompton & Harefield NHS Trust said it would be working with the Healthcare Commission and the National Specialised Commissioning Team (NSC Team) over the next month.

September 26, 2008
Protests over controversial decision to move cancer specialist unit out of Cornwall

NHS bosses have taken the controversial step of moving specialist cancer surgery services out of Cornwall and into the neighbouring county of Devon.

Campaigners had fought to keep throat and neck cancer surgery at the Royal Cornwall Hospital (RCH) in Treliske, but their hopes were dashed after an independent review recommending the move to Derriford Hospital in Plymouth was rubber-stamped by the Cornwall and Isles of Scilly Primary Care Trust.

September 24, 2008
UK hospital cancels surgical procedures following outbreak of diarrhoea and vomiting

A health trust has had to cancel surgical procedures at two hospitals following an outbreak of diarrhoea and vomiting that affected a total of 14 wards.

The Worcestershire Acute Hospitals NHS Trust said that the Alexandra Hospital in Redditch and the Worcestershire Royal Hospital in Worcester had both seen a "steady increase" in the number of people with diarrhoea and vomiting.

Both hospitals had to cancel surgery due to cases of illness, some of which include the infectious norovirus.

September 2, 2008
Research suggests patients undergoing new joint operations may need repeat surgery

Patients undergoing certain types of new joint operations may be more likely to need repeat surgery, research has suggested.

A study into revision rates in England found that people having newer types of hip resurfacing and knee replacement were more likely to need further corrective surgery in the future.

Researchers from the Royal College of Surgeons of England looked at data for 327,557 hip or knee replacement procedures carried out between April 2003 and September 2006.

August 13, 2008
Hospital blunder leads to patient's removal of healthy lung removed

A health board has apologised to a firefighter who had surgery to remove a lung after being misdiagnosed with cancer.

Laurence Ball, 58, was told he had a tumour in his lung and needed an operation to remove the organ. Surgery took place in August 2005 at Aberdeen Royal Infirmary where doctors removed the whole lung.

However, soon after the operation, doctors told Mr Ball that he would not need chemotherapy - as he never had cancer in the first place.

July 21, 2008
Surgeons at Imperial College Healthcare Trust to receive bonus payments for surgical outcomes

Britain's largest hospital trust is preparing to launch a pilot scheme of bonus payments for surgical outcomes.

London's Imperial College Healthcare Trust will be testing a Department of Health initiative to offer incentives based on criteria from patient mortality and rates of infection, to readmission and post-operative mobility.

A spokesperson for the trust said: "We are looking at a pilot scheme for a particular operation which will measure the improved functionality of the patient, and we are looking at linking certain performance-related bonuses to that."

July 14, 2008
Annual Report of the Chief Medical Officer for England hails development of vaccines

A vaccine for C difficile is possible within three years, and a vaccine for MRSA within 10 years, according to Sir Liam Donaldson, Chief Medical Officer for England.

Sir Liam made the claim at the launch of his 2007 Annual Report, which is published today.
 
"Vaccination is arguably the most important public health development in the history of humankind,” he said. “Over the last 200 years it has saved hundreds of millions of lives worldwide.

July 11, 2008
UK surgical teams' mortality rates compared on NHS Choices website

In a step towards greater openness with health information, death rates for patients undergoing major surgery at NHS hospital trusts in England have been published for the first time.

NHS medical director Sir Bruce Keogh said the move would be followed by a release of information on different procedures in the months to come.

It is the first time anywhere in the world that a government has exposed the mortality rates of different surgical teams to scrutiny in this way.

July 4, 2008
Complications in routine knee surgery lead to UK woman losing leg

A hospital has apologised to an Ipswich woman who had her right leg amputated following complications with a knee operation.

Karen Flory is taking legal action over her treatment at Ipswich Hospital, following what was expected to be routine surgery last year to have inflamed tissue removed from her right knee.
But Kester Cunningham John, the law firm representing Ms Flory, said blood circulation problems resulted in medics amputating the 37-year-old's leg above the knee in a separate operation hours later.

June 30, 2008
Doctors have not been deterred from attempting high-risk operations, according to data

Doctors have not been deterred from attempting high-risk operations, according to the publication of heart surgery survival rates which show a marginal improvement in the UK.

New figures published by the Healthcare Commission showed that the national survival rate for all types of heart operations between April 2006 and March 2007 stood at 96.6%, up 0.1% on the previous year's figure. Heart surgery became the first speciality to publish information on survival in 2006.

June 25, 2008
A new global surgery safety checklist is being launched by the World Health Organization

British health minister and surgeon Lord Darzi will today give a keynote speech at the National Patient Safety Agency's (NPSA) participation in the launch of a new global surgery safety checklist.

The new checklist was drawn up by the World Health Organization (WHO) as part of its "WHO Safe Surgery Saves Lives" initiative.

The initative saw over 200 national and international medical societies and health ministries cooperating to reduce complications and avoidable deaths from surgery.

June 10, 2008
A TV star's revelation has resulted in a 400% increase in inquiries about gastric banding

TV star Fern Britton's revelation that she lost five stones after having gastric band surgery has resulted in a 400% increase in inquiries about the procedure to a leading stomach surgeon.

David Hewin, consultant surgeon at Gloucestershire Royal Hospital, said 20 potential new patients keen to have the surgery had contacted his office after the This Morning presenter confessed that her new, slim figure was not entirely down to dieting.

June 10, 2008
BBC News reports on an allegations that a private clinic ran unnecessary operations to make money

Police in Italy have said that alleged unnecessary operations to make money led to the death of five patients, BBC News has reported.

BBC News said that five elderly patients died following unnecessary procedures, according to police, including a woman who died after having been made to have three operations to resect a tumour instead of one.

According to BBC News, the police said clinic staff falsified medical tests to provide justification for the operations, and in doing so boosted their income by as much as €25,000 (£20,000) in some months.

May 29, 2008
The number of people having obesity surgery has increased by more than 40% it has been claimed

The number of people having obesity surgery in the UK has increased by more than 40%, resulting in pressures on both public health budgets and healthcare staff, it has been claimed.

Shadow health secretary Andrew Lansley announced the figures, which show that in 2006/07, 3,459 gastric bypass operations were carried out on the National Health Service (NHS) in England, up 41% on the 2,448 figure for 2005/06.