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Saturday 19 October 2019
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Topic: ambulance

December 18, 2008
HSE aims to save millions of euros on health facilities by cutting costs in A&E services

Health chiefs are to review accident and emergency services in the Irish Republic after groups raised concerns over the Health Service Executive's (HSE) plan for 2009, which is expected to slash A&E facilities in Cork and Dublin.

The 12-month plan revealed the HSE aims to make at least 520 million euro in savings throughout the year, including cutting costs in Dublin's three children's hospitals.

The Irish Patients' Association (IPA) said its main concerns was the proposed reconfiguration of A&E and paediatric services.

September 29, 2008
Healthcare Commission review reveals patients are facing unnecessary delays in emergency care

A major report into emergency care in England has revealed that patients are facing unnecessary delays and confusion over access to such care.

The Healthcare Commission review revealed wide variations in how patients are treated, concluding that people are confused over where to seek help, face unnecessary delays on being admitted to hospital, and some out-of-hours care is poor.

The Commission said there were also fears over how quickly patients taken to A&E in an ambulance start receiving care.

May 27, 2008
An ambulance service in the UK has procured software to help it achieve IT targets

An ambulance service in the UK has procured software to help it achieve IT targets.
 
NETconsent automated policy and procedure management software has been purchased to help North East Ambulance Service achieve some of its information governance targets.
 
A pilot project will distribute two policies to 5% of the workforce. 100 users of the system will have an opportunity to feedback before the full roll out. A staged implementation is being adopted, as there are a huge number of policies and procedures within the trust.

April 15, 2008
Medical staff arriving before police at the scene of a violent incident are walking into a "danger zone", a union has said

Medical staff arriving before police at the scene of a violent incident are walking into a "danger zone", a union has said.

Paramedics and ambulance crews are put in a "terrible dilemma" because they are trained to save lives but are often putting their own safety at risk, according to research by Unison.

The union published a dossier of incidents ahead of its annual health workers' conference in Manchester, showing that medics face growing problems of violence and verbal abuse.

February 18, 2008
UK public services union Unison has claimed that ambulances are being used as waiting rooms, reported the BBC

UK public services union Unison has claimed that ambulances are being used as waiting rooms, reported the BBC.

Unison said that so-called "patient stacking" in ambulances was aimed to meet government targets on treatment times.

A union spokeswoman, Mary Maguire said:

"It happens time and time again. It is an appalling waste of resources. We should not use ambulances as waiting rooms."

Currently, there is a four-hour limit on waiting times for patients to be admitted to accident and emergency (A&E) departments.

December 11, 2007
The health minister has defended plans to answer more 999 calls with one-person ambulance crews amid concerns it could put further pressure on hospitals.

The health minister has defended plans to answer more 999 calls with one-person ambulance crews amid concerns it could put further pressure on hospitals.

Ben Bradshaw said sending a "single responder" rather than two people in an ambulance in certain cases will help free up resources and not put patients at risk.

He added: "Fast-response vehicles can often get to the scene faster than traditional ambulances, and can provide assessment and care until a further response arrives."

December 11, 2007
Plans to use "solo-responders" to answer more emergency calls come under fire over fears that patients could be at risk

Plans to use so-called "solo-responders" to answer more emergency calls have come under fire from ambulance unions and doctors who fear that patients could be put at risk.

Many two-person ambulance crews are being split up in some NHS areas to meet new response-time targets.

Some staff say solo-responders are not always appropriate and that it is a bid to get the service on the cheap.